Tagged: PS4

Welcome to last week: Alien: Isolation – PlayStation 4

Alien2

Well the title will be a give away that I am now a PlayStation 4 owner, but I shall leave that to another post. Right now we are looking at Sega’s latest attempt to gain some credibility with the use of the Aliens franchise licence that it acquired from Twentieth Century Fox.

Many will no doubt remember Sega’s last Aliens release – the much maligned Aliens: Colonial Marines. Released in early 2013 to much anticipation, the game was by and large classed as a “train wreck”. While I personally would not go quite that far in criticising the game, Gearbox certainly did not give the game the justice it deserved and should have got their backsides royally kicked by Sega.

The huge fallout from the release, especially over how it fell drastically short of what had been expected based on promotional material, is well charted across the gaming community, so I’m not going to drag it back up here. Eighteen months on and Sega are publishing Alien: Isolation and in the attempt no doubt try to gain some credibility of their custody of the licence. Programmed by the Creative Assembly, the game is played in first person, but it is not a FPS like Aliens: CM.

alien5

Set 15 years after the events of the first film, Amanda Ripley, daughter of Nostromo survivor Ellen Ripley, is looking for closure after the disappearance of her mother. Amanda is told a report has been received stating the flight recorder for the Nostromo has been recovered and is being held at a remote space station – the Sevastopol. Accompanied by two Weyland-Yutani employees, Amanda sets out for Sevastopol and upon arrival quickly finds things have very much gone awry. And so the game begins, first with trying to establish what has gone wrong, and then trying to escape Sevastopol itself.

Ammunition is in short supply, but the game is very much about stealth and avoiding combat, than any outright action. This is more of a first person Metal Gear Solid than Resident Evil. The Alien itself cannot be killed, but androids and hostile humans can all be dispatched if required. Missions are task based affairs requiring you to either collect something from a certain area or to just survive from point A to point B. Weapons can be complimented with some homemade devices intended to distract or disorientate which are “crafted” from parts found lying around Sevastopol.

alien4

If I were to give Alien: Isolation only one note of praise, then it would have to be for the environments that make up Sevastopol.  Should you have ever only shown some interest in Ridley Scott’s original Alien film, you cannot fail to be impressed by how well Sevastopol mimics the environments of that film. Apparently the programmers studied original Alien set designs by the legendary Ron Cobb, and the faithfulness to this is evident throughout thus creating a strong bond to the original material the game is trying to lead on from.

There are some issues with the game, however. When looking down at the floor, Amanda’s feet are not very well integrated with the environment and it looks like you’re walking on air – very odd. It’s a minor gripe, but it really should not be there. Another occasional problem is clipping. In one area I defended myself by attacking a woman who was about to shoot me, clubbing her around the head with my wrench, I expected her to fall down dead. Instead I must have hit her that hard that her body vaporised, because it just disappeared!!

Another minor irritation is the inventory management system, which is fine early on in the game when you only have, literally, a few items, but later on as your choice of weapons and aids has expanded, choosing the item you want can be cumbersome with getting the appropriate icon highlighted for selection. I actually found many of the crafted items redundant, but I guess it depends on your own strategies to survive.

alien3

The Alien’s dogged persistence in staying in your area, even though it has not seen you (but knows you’re there), can be hugely annoying. Some times you feel as if you are stuck in your bolt hole for far too long before you feel confident enough to move off to a safer area… and if you do stay in the same spot for too long the Alien will find and kill you. The game is tough enough as it is, and I felt that a little more breathing space should have been granted if the Alien decides its prey has evaded it and moved on. I felt this also hindered my desire to explore Sevastopol further. Once you know the Alien is nearby, it immediately puts you on edge (which is a good thing for the game), and deters you from exploring rooms you’ve not yet accessed. Sevastopol is huge, and there is so much to explore, but with the Alien on to you half the time, you just want to make it from A – B as quickly as possible… or to the next nearest save point!

Indeed saving is an important part in progressing. I had read several reviews underscoring the requirement to save, save, save! Personally, if I could give any tactical advice on getting through the game, it would be to follow the mantra of “save, save, save” as much as possible. Especially after any encounters with the Alien have been passed.

The sound is excellent, and very much forms part of the game. Creative Assembly have been allowed the use of many musical cues from the Alien film, and they use these to create atmosphere, build tension and to warn of impending danger. Being a big aficionado of the first film, I was very impressed with the way the cues are implemented while you explore, it felt like I was in the film at times. Sound also plays a big part through noise. Very rarely will you walk through a section of Sevastopol without some kind of clanging going on, a klaxon going off, or rattling of some kind emanating from the corridors. This of course puts you very much on edge as you try to keep composed. I really do not recall playing a game where the sound has played such an integral part in building the game’s atmosphere since the original Silent Hill.

alien1

Overall the game is very well put together. The graphics are brilliant, the lighting top notch, the sound is fantastic and the game is a good length; making this by far the best Alien game of recent years, and arguably the best game to use the main film franchise to date. The game will not be everyone’s cup of tea. Some will lament the lack of any full blown action, the slow narrative pace, and no doubt the tension / suspense created by encounters with the creature will not be to all tastes. Yet, I feel that it fulfils the brief Creative Assembly set out very well and they are to be commended for their efforts in bringing the Alien world so effectively into our homes. Alien: Isolation is not perfect, but it is very, very good.

If only Aliens: Colonial Marines could have had production values like these…

Alien: Isolation
Version tested: PlayStation 4
Also available on: PC, Xbox One, Xbox 360, PlayStation 3.

Advertisements

Welcome To Last Week… The Last of Us

tlou4

PlayStation developer Naughty Dog was once best known for its part in foisting the PSX’s answer to Sonic The Hedgehog upon us with the Crash Bandicoot series of games. While not being my thing, the Crash games were well produced, sold well, and generally received favourable reviews from critics back in the day. However, in the last 5 or 6 years Naughty Dog has somewhat reinvented itself as a developer of high quality cinematic action adventure games with the critically and commercially successful Uncharted series on PS3.

The Uncharted games certainly provided a very good reason to consider buying a PS3 over the Xbox 360 at retail with their exclusivity to Sony’s console, and to my mind, while there are some good 360 exclusives out there, Microsoft’s console never really came up with a serious rebuttal to Nathan Drake’s modern-day take on Indiana Jones. Nevertheless, I do not think that Uncharted alone would have been the tipping point in most gamer’s decisions over which console to pick up, assuming one was initially ambivalent over which of the seventh generation consoles to buy. I had already long bought a 360 by the time Uncharted: Drake’s Fortune was released in late 2007, and while I admit that it looked quite good, and sounded promising from the coverage I caught in Edge at the time, I wasn’t tempted to break out my old flexible friend and pick up a PS3 for this alone. However, you cannot deny the quality of production values that Naughty Dog have been injecting into their PS3 releases and the impressive way they have moved away from pseudo-“kiddies” games like Crash Bandicoot and Jak and Daxter to the mature content of the releases we’ve seen since (and including) Uncharted.

tlou1

In the Spring of 2013, with the next generation of consoles only months away from launch, Naughty Dog delivered what could be rightly described as the PlayStation 3’s swan song – The Last of Us.

The back drop to the game is nothing that we haven’t seen before.
A global pandemic has all but wiped out modern civilisation, and those that have survived are living in heavily fortified zones protected by the military. Outside of these zones are other remains of humanity, pocketed in small areas of once thriving towns and cities surviving to live amongst the decay and detritus, but away from the order laid down by the military. The virus that has wrecked humanity starts life as spores getting into the brain and then developing into a fungus that turns the host into violent zombie. Over time the fungus grows deforming the head and other parts of the body, and there is no cure. These poor souls are referred to as the “Infected“, and there are a lot of them still out there looking for fresh victims as the virus can also be spread by being bitten.

After a short prologue to the main game, which sees the last hours of our world before the virus begins to spread, you take control of one of the survivors, Joel. Set twenty years later, Joel has become a smuggler of guns and pharmaceuticals with his partner, Tess, and through a twist of events get involved with a resistance movement called the Firefly’s, whereby they are entrusted to escort a young girl, Ellie, across country to a Firefly stronghold. As the game progress a strong relationship between Joel and Ellie forms which helps them drive forward, against the odds, to their ultimate destination.

The action elements are formulated of confrontations either with hostile human opponents, or the Infected. Weapons are not available in abundance, so fortunately Joel can look after himself, and many enemies can be dispatched by hand in ways not entirely dissimilar to what you would expect in Uncharted. Weapons that are available come in the form of small arms and cruder weapons such as shiv’s or baseball bats. To make matters more interesting not only are bullets in short supply, but non-ballistic weapons can only be used a few times before they will break and become useless. Therefore scavenging becomes a key part of the game process when not engaging in combat or avoiding enemies. You will find yourself searching high and low for the parts to make a shiv or Molotov cocktail, if you’re lucky you may find some bullets, but you’ll search everywhere for items so that you can survive.

The game requires you to think, and in many cases will allow you the opportunity to squirrel yourself away to one side while you consider what the best plan of attack will be, if indeed attack is a genuine option. Early on in the game, when ammunition and weapons are probably at their most scant, if you decide to become a one-man zombie-Terminator you are going to come unstuck very quickly indeed. As in real life, you use your intelligence to pick and choose your battles. Do it wisely and you’ll progress; the alternative usually results in death or making the next encounter ever the more tricky. The computer AI is excellent, and you will be quickly hunted down should you even accidentally give your position away. There are a few battles where a direct approach is required, but they are few and far between, and thus generally the action is of a cerebral variety as you eliminate those that block your path. The game is not easy, and there will be plenty of deaths before you pass certain areas. Indeed, some encounters really crank up the tension as you potentially face being overwhelmed if you do not enact a suitable strategy or respond quickly enough.

tlou2

Of course the action is not entirely the primary driver of the game; it is the narrative and the relationship that forms between Joel and Ellie, and the action constantly plays second fiddle to the story being told. This cannot be highlighted more than in the dying minutes of the game where you would be rightly expecting one thing to happen, and your resilience is rewarded with something else entirely. In fact the game’s concluding minutes are very clever and I applaud Naughty Dog for taking the route they took to bring the story to a close.

The graphics are of the highest quality, well drawn, everything has character, and the lighting effects are just beautiful. The animation is some of the best I have seen, with lots of detail in facial expressions bringing the characters more to life and further enhancing the relationship building that goes on between them and between you and them. Sound, both music and audio, is first rate as you would expect if you’ve ever played any of the Uncharted games. Technically this must be pushing the PS3 to its limits, and it’s doubtful we’ll see anything of this quality launched on the system again now that the PS4 is centre of Sony’s attention.

The Last of Us is not perfect (criticisms I do have are all very minor), but within the genre that it sits in, it comes as close as one can get to gaming perfection in my opinion, and it will be interesting to see which developers try to copy or surpass the game, within its kind, as time moves on.

One developer who should take note of The Last of Us gameplay and narrative is Capcom. In many ways Capcom have spear headed the zombie genre’s rise to prominence in modern media with the Biohazard (aka Resident Evil) series, but they have lost their way considerably since the brilliant Biohazard 4, and perhaps ever more so since Biohazard 5 as Biohazard 6 is just a complete mess. Biohazard 5 has many redeeming qualities for me, even if it is not as good as its predecessor. I cannot say the same for the abomination that is Biohazard 6. If Capcom can extract just some of the essence of The Last of Us, combine that with the characters and story strands of Biohazard, and refocus on the one player element instead of fixating on the need to pander to multi-player, then they may be able to inject some credibility back into the franchise. After all, Naughty Dog have gone on record as saying that Biohazard 4 was a big inspiration to them during the development of The Last of Us.

tlou3

With the cost of PS3 hardware now plummeting as retailers look to clear their shelves for additional space for PS4, there has never been a better time to pick up a brand new PS3 on the cheap so that one can play this game. While it may seem a bit extreme, the investment will be worth the experience that will unfold and you can then of course take in many of the other PS3 exclusives like the aforementioned Uncharted, plus Gran Turismo and others. I have no idea how many individual video games I have played since I was born, but there aren’t that many I really wanted to sit down and play through again immediately after completing them for the first time. With The Last of Us I did not get that feeling. The feeling I got was sadness, I was actual sad that I had completed the game, that my journey with Joel and Ellie had come to an end and there was no more story left to tell. I do not think I can say that about any game I have ever played or completed before; and I think that, more than anything else, that sums up the emotional impact of the thoroughly good story told by The Last of Us.

I shall, of course, be returning shortly to experience this epic once more, and I look forward to the forth coming single player DLC. I can only hope that if Naughty Dog decide to continue Joel & Ellie’s adventure, that the game is every bit as good as this; they have left themselves a mighty high mountain to climb… indeed a part of me would like to see the game as a stand alone title. Alas, I am sure commercial pressures will dictate otherwise. Still if any developer can trump their previous lofty achievements, on their record so far, it would be Naughty Dog.

All I got for Christmas was…

Another Christmas over and done with! I hope “Santa” brought you all you hoped for, I was certainly quite pleased with my modest “haul” of games this year.

Playing catch up with Xbox 360 and PS3 and I managed to snag The Last of Us, Uncharted 2 and Killzone 2 for the latter, and Gears of War 3 for the former. I’ve felt that the release line up for Europe this Christmas has been a little lacklustre, but undoubtedly the whole industry has been overshadowed by the launch of the Xbox One and the PlayStation 4. I’m sure a lot of you have been enjoying Call of Duty: Ghosts, but, to be honest I do not go in for the whole online multi-player thing, and I find the one-player campaigns to be fun but generally uninspiring… I think once you’ve played one COD, you’ve pretty much played them all. Come to think of it, I’m not sure I even bothered to complete last years Call of Duty: Black Ops II

I hope those of you that picked up or, better still, were bought PS4’s or Xbox One’s for Christmas are enjoying their new consoles, and I look forward to joining you some time into the New Year when the software line ups are a little stronger than they are now.

Anyway, more importantly are the Christmas retro additions, and to that end along with the previously mentioned Salamander Deluxe Pack for Saturn, I’ve also seen in the arrival of Arkanoid 2000 R and Super Pang Collection for PSX. That will most likely mark a hiatus on all things fresh into the household for the time being, but that certainly will not mean a dearth of new topics for me to over!